Christmas Tree Pet Safety

December 8th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation

Columbia River Natural Pet Foods Inc. Recalls Cow Pie Fresh Frozen Meats for Dogs and Cats

December 6th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation

By 

Pets, Asbestos Exposure, and Mesothelioma

December 5th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation

From www.mesothelioma.net

For more information and to sign up to receive resources by mail, go to:

https://mesothelioma.net/pets-asbestos-exposure-mesothelioma/

Pets, like their human caretakers, are susceptible to becoming ill from asbestos exposure. Dogs, cats, and other animals can develop mesothelioma and other asbestos-related illnesses, with devastating consequences. As with humans, mesothelioma in pets is an aggressive and deadly type of cancer. The treatment options are even more limited and the hope of survival minimal.

Pets may become exposed to asbestos in many of the same ways people are. Older homes with worn and exposed asbestos insulation, for instance, can send fibers into the air that humans and animals alike may inhale. If the owner works around asbestos and brings fibers home on clothing, this too can lead to exposure in pets. Mesothelioma in pets is rare, but it is possible. It is important to minimize exposure risks for people and animals in the household.
mesothelioma in pets

Asbestos Exposure Causes Mesothelioma in Pets

Evidence that points to asbestos as a cause of mesothelioma in humans is already overwhelming. Research into pets with mesothelioma is much more limited, but it does exist. One study, for instance, examined the tissues of dogs that died from mesothelioma. Researchers saw pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial mesothelioma in the population of dogs studied and even some that had cancerous tissues in more than one part of the mesothelium. Most of the dogs in the study were found to have asbestos in the affected tissues, providing a link between the cancer and exposure to asbestos. Dogs in a control group had far fewer fibers.

Stories of animals suffering and dying from mesothelioma are rare, but heartbreaking.  In the United Kingdom there was a case reported of a dog that died from mesothelioma. The devastated owners reported that their dog had sniffed asbestos-containing materials that had been dumped at old building sites in the woods where they regularly walked. After thousands of dollars in vet bills the dog could not be saved.

How Pets May Be Exposed to Asbestos

Although mesothelioma is rare, it is strongly linked to exposure to asbestos so pet owners need to be aware of the asbestos risks and should take steps to minimize any possibility of exposure. One of the most likely ways in which an animal may be exposed is through secondhand contact. If you come home from work with fibers of asbestos on your clothes, your pet is likely to inhale those fibers or even ingest them.

Pets may also be exposed to asbestos that is in the home. Homes built before the 1980s most likely contain asbestos in insulation, HVAC systems, flooring, siding, ceiling materials, and other areas of the house. If that asbestos is disturbed, worn down, or damaged, the fibers can become airborne where they can be inhaled by anyone in the house, including pets.

This risk is especially high during renovation or remodeling projects. This kind of work can disturb previously encapsulated asbestos. The best way to protect animals during home projects is to keep them temporarily out of the home, at someone else’s house or at a kennel or boarding facility. While humans can wear protective gear, animals cannot. Also, dogs may lick things on which asbestos dust has settled.
Like the dog in the United Kingdom that died after being exposed to asbestos on walks, exposure outside of the home is a rare but possible risk for pets, especially dogs. Dogs that go outdoors for walks or spend a lot of time out in the yard may be at risk for exposure from any nearby demolition, construction, or mining.

Symptoms of Mesothelioma in Pets

If your pet has been exposed to asbestos, you may see signs of illness. If you catch these early and have your dog or cat diagnosed and treated, you may be able to extend the life of your beloved pet. There is no way to cure mesothelioma in cats or dogs, but early detection can give you more treatment options and a better chance of giving him or her a better quality of life for as long as is left. Dogs are more likely to develop mesothelioma than cats.

With pleural mesothelioma, a pet may exhibit signs such as labored breathing, rapid breathing, or shortness of breath, and a cough. With peritoneal mesothelioma, an animal may display abdominal discomfort, abdominal swelling, or vomiting. Other symptoms of any type of mesothelioma may include fatigue and lethargy, an enlarged scrotum, and unusual sounds in the abdomen or chest.

Diagnosing and Treating Mesothelioma

If you see any unusual symptoms in your dog or cat, you should take your pet to the vet immediately. If you have any reason to believe your pet may have been exposed to asbestos, inform your veterinarian so that your animal will get a complete diagnosis. As with humans, diagnosing mesothelioma can be tricky. Your vet will begin with a physical exam and likely a blood and urine analysis. From there your vet will probably want to do imaging tests, like an X-ray, to look for tissue abnormalities. The next step would be a biopsy to remove fluid or tissue for examination.

Much of the treatment given to an animal for mesothelioma will be palliative, to keep the pet comfortable. However, there are some cancer treatments that may slow the progression of the disease and give you more time with your pet. In one small study, a specific combination of chemotherapy drugs allowed a dog to go into remission, although other animals in the study did not. Palliative treatments for an animal with mesothelioma include medications for pain and procedures to drain fluid from the abdomen or chest cavity.

Help Your Pet Live with Mesothelioma

A diagnosis of cancer in a pet is devastating news, especially when the prognosis is not favorable. There are things you can do to make sure your pet lives the rest of his or her days in the most comfort possible. Limiting activity is important, especially for a pet with pleural mesothelioma. Taking slower and shorter walks can give your dog a chance for exercise and fresh air without overexertion, for instance.

Your pet should also be given a quiet and comfortable place in the home to rest. Make this area easy to access, but out of the way of noise or disruption so that he or she can rest as needed. Regular visits to the vet are also important so you can be sure that you are doing the best for your animal and providing all the care that is necessary for maximum comfort. When the time is right you may need to make the difficult decision about letting your pet go, but your vet can help you make that choice. The loss of a pet to a disease like mesothelioma is terrible and the only way to prevent it is to keep your pet safe from asbestos.

 

Stress-Free Holidays with Pets

November 25th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation

By Kim Campbell Thornton for www.fearfreehappyhomes.com

Dangling ornaments. Rich food. Brightly blooming plants. Parties. No matter what your species—human, canine or feline—there’s a lot to love about the holidays. But in the wrong hands, er, paws, those same things can cause everything from a bellyache to a bite to a trip to the emergency room. Here are three ways to avoid common mistakes that turn holidays from happy to horrible.

Room To Chill

Some dogs and cats love the comings and goings of the holidays—visitors, parties, package deliveries—but others would just as soon not have their routine disrupted, their heads patted by strangers, or the doorbell ringing constantly to signal the arrival of cards and presents.

Whether you have a social butterfly who enjoys greeting guests or an introvert who lies low during any hustle and bustle, provide pets with a sanctuary room where they can relax if things become overwhelming. Stock it with a Snuffle Mat strewn with puffed rice or O-shaped cereal, a Kong stuffed with goodies, and some interactive toys.

If your dog or cat becomes overstimulated by the presence of non-family members or large numbers of people, it’s okay to not invite him to the party, especially if stress and anxiety could cause him to deliver a bite or scratch.

Set up his sanctuary room as far from the festivities as possible. Dampen sounds by turning on a white-noise machine or playing an audiobook (try Charles Dickens’s “A Christmas Carol” read by Tim Curry) or classical Christmas music. Plug in a pheromone diffuser to fill the air with calming chemicals that mimic the soothing natural pheromones emitted by mother dogs and cats.

Train Guests

We tend to think of our pets as the ones who need training, but human guests may be more in need of it. Not everyone is pet-savvy. Alert arrivals to house rules regarding pets: don’t let them run out the door, always close the gate fully, don’t leave food or drink within reach, don’t offer food from the table, or whatever other standards apply in your home.

Guests who are completely unfamiliar with dogs or cats may be uncomfortable around them or unsure of how to interact with them. Show them how your pet likes to be touched—or let them know if she doesn’t—advise them not to stare, remind them to watch where they step, and alert them to foods that are toxic to pets, such as chocolate, grapes, cooked bones, or anything containing the sugar substitute xylitol. Be sure they know that rich, fatty foods such as gravy and stuffing can be a recipe for life-threatening pancreatitis.

Ask if wrapped gifts contain food. Put food gifts you don’t want your pet to “unwrap” behind closed doors, not under the tree.

Talking Plants

Place holiday greenery out of reach or decorate with artificial plants. At best, pets nibble on live décor and then throw up, usually in the middle of your tree-trimming party. At worst, plants such as mistletoe, holly, lilies, and amaryllis can cause mild to severe vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, difficulty breathing, and even death if a pet eats their berries, leaves, or bulbs. Mistletoe is especially toxic and can kill within hours.

Tie down the tree. To protect it from being knocked over by playful dogs or climbing kittens, use fishing line to anchor the tree to the ceiling or wall. You may also want to surround the tree with an exercise pen or other barrier to prevent pets from chewing electrical cords. To further discourage chewing, encase cords in sturdy cable covers. Avoid decorating with tinsel or ribbon, which can be damaging or even deadly to pets if swallowed.

Safety matters, but an equally important way to keep holidays happy and pet-friendly is to maintain a normal schedule as much as possible, especially when it comes to mealtimes, walks, and playtime. You may be busy, but your pet isn’t. Spend a few minutes one-on-one with her every day. She’ll appreciate the attention, and you’ll benefit from the downtime as well.

This article was reviewed/edited by board-certified veterinary behaviorist Dr. Kenneth Martin and/or veterinary technician specialist in behavior Debbie Martin, LVT.

Natural Life Pet Products Issues Recall of Dry Food Due to Elevated Levels of Vitamin D

November 6th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation

For Immediate Release

November 2, 2018

Contact

Consumers

Natural Life Pet Products
consumerservices@nutrisca.com
(888) 279-9420

Announcement

Natural Life Pet Products of Saint Louis, Missouri is voluntarily recalling our Chicken & Potato dry dog food (described below) due to it containing elevated levels of Vitamin D.

17.5 lbs. Natural Life Chicken & Potato Dry Dog Food Bag UPC: 0-12344-08175-1

Bags affected have a Best By Date code of May 29, 2020 through August 10, 2020. The Best By Date code can be found on the back or bottom of each bag.

The products were distributed to retail stores in Georgia, Florida, Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and California.

Natural Life Pet Products became aware of the elevated levels of vitamin D after receiving complaints from three pet owners of vitamin D toxicity after consuming the product. An investigation revealed a formulation error led to the elevated vitamin D in the product.

Consumers should stop feeding the product listed above. Dogs ingesting elevated levels of Vitamin D may exhibit symptoms such as vomiting, loss of appetite, increased thirst, increased urination, excessive drooling, and weight loss. Vitamin D when consumed at very high levels can lead to serious health issues in dogs including renal dysfunction. Consumers with dogs who have consumed the product listed above and are exhibiting these symptoms, should contact their veterinarian.

Consumers who have purchased the product affected by this recall should dispose of it or return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers with questions may contact Natural Life Pet Products at (888) 279-9420 from 8 AM to 5 PM Central Standard time, Monday through Friday, or by email at consumerservices@nutrisca.com for more information.

This is a voluntary recall and is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

We genuinely regret that this has occurred as we place the highest priority on the health of pets.

G & C Dog and Cat Food Recall Expands to Include Multiple Brands

October 28th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation
October 24, 2018 — G & C Raw of Versailles, Ohio, is recalling all products lots manufactured from February 27, 2018 through July 20, 2018, because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Affected products are sold under the brand names G & C Raw Dog Food and G & C Raw Cat Food and sold through direct distribution to customers.

Product Image

No product images have been provided by either the company or the Food and Drug Administration.

About Listeria

Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in animals eating the products.

Furthermore, there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, aches, fever, and diarrhea.

Listeria monocytogenes infections can cause serious andsometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.

Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Listeria monocytogenes infections are rare, and pets may display symptoms such as mild to severe diarrhea, anorexia, fever, nervous, muscular and respiratory signs, abortion, depression, shock, and death.

In addition to the possibility of becoming sick, such infected animals can shed Listeria monocytogenes through their feces onto their coats and into the home environment and thus serve as sources of infection to humans and other animals in the household.

If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Where Was Product Distributed?

Recalled products were distributed by direct delivery and may have been sent to the following states:

  • Georgia
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kentucky
  • Michigan
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • Tennessee

What’s Being Recalled?

The manufacture dates are included at the end of the lot number.

For example, the pet food product manufactured on February 27, 2018 has a lot code of that ends with 022718.

The company is now recalling all products with lot numbers that end in 022718 through 072018.

The recalled dog food products include:

  • Beef Veggie Mix Dog Food
  • Ground Beef Dog Food
  • Sliced Beef Heart Dog Food
  • Ground Beef Heart Dog Food
  • Kim’s Special Beef Organ Dog Food
  • Ground Chicken Dog Food
  • Chicken Veggie Mix Dog Food
  • Chicken Mix Patties Dog Food
  • Duck Veggie Mix Dog Food
  • Ground Duck Dog Food
  • Ground Rabbit Dog Food
  • Rabbit Veggie Mix Dog Food
  • Ground Lamb Dog Food
  • Lamb Veggie Mix Dog Food
  • Ground Beef Pancreas Dog Food
  • Beef Liver Chunks Dog Food
  • Beef Sweet Breads Dog Food
  • Ground Pork Dog Food
  • Pork Veggie Mix Dog Food
  • Shelby’s Pork Organ Mix Dog Food
  • Ground Pollock Dog Food
  • Turkey Veggie Mix Dog Food
  • Ground Turkey Dog Food
  • Tripe Dog Food

The recalled cat food products include:

  • Pat’s Cat Beef
  • Pat’s Cat Chicken
  • Pat’s Cat Turkey
  • Pat’s Cat Duck
  • Pat’s Cat Rabbit

No confirmed illnesses have been reported to date.

What Caused the Recall?

The recall was initiated as the result of a routine sampling program by the Ohio Department of Agriculture which revealed that some finished products contained the bacteria.

What to Do?

Consumers who have purchased the products are urged to return them to G & C Raw, 225 N. West Street, Versailles, OH, for a full refund.

Consumers with questions may contact G & C Raw at 937-827-0010 from 9 to 5 pm Easter Time or by email at mgcrawdogfood@yahoo.com.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

Get Dog Food Recall Alerts by Email

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Dog Food Advisor’s emergency recall notification system.

Performance Dog Pet Food Recall

September 16th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation

September 12, 2018 — Bravo Packing, Inc. of Carneys Point, New Jersey, is recalling all Performance Dog products, a frozen raw pet food, because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

What’s Recalled?

The following products are affected by the recall:

  • Performance Dog
    Package Size: 2-pound plastic sleeve
    Mfg Date Code: 071418
  • Performance Dog
    Package Size: 5-pound plastic sleeve
    Mfg Date Code: 071418

Performance Dog comes frozen in 2-pound and 5-pound plastic sleeves.

The recalled product has manufacture date code 071418.

The manufacture date codes are printed on the boxes that contain the plastic sleeves, but not on the individual plastic sleeves.

Therefore, if the cardboard box has been discarded, there are no unique identification numbers on the individual sleeves that allow customers to determine that they possess the recalled products.

If you purchased this product since July 14, 2018 and cannot determine whether it is affected by the recall, the FDA recommends that you exercise caution and throw the product away.

About Salmonella

Salmonella can cause illness in animals eating the products, as well as people who handle contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products, infected animals or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis (an infection of the heart muscle), arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

People who have these symptoms after having contact with this product or an animal that has eaten this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

Some pets will have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Pets exposed to contaminated food can be infected without showing symptoms.

If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Infected animals can also shed Salmonella through their feces and saliva, spreading pathogens into the home environment and to humans and other animals in the household.

No human or animal illnesses have been reported to date.

What Caused the Recall?

Bravo Packing, Inc. is voluntarily recalling this product after a sample of Performance Dog, collected during an FDA inspection, tested positive for Salmonella.

Performance Dog generally works with the distributor Tefco, located in Brooklyn , New York, that fills orders to brick-and-mortar retail stores or to consumers directly.

What to Do?

Consumers with questions should contact Bravo Packing, Inc. at 856-299-1044 (Monday thru Friday, 6 AM to 2 PM, Saturday 4 AM to 9 AM ET) or through the company’s website at www.bravopacking.com.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to https://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

Get Dog Food Recall Alerts by Email

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Dog Food Advisor’s emergency recall notification system

Surgery Returns Baby Kitty to His Idyllic Outdoor Life

July 12th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation

Baby Kitty – a beautiful Siamese cat – had “a few issues with eating and tummy problems” in 2016, owner Cherry Simkins recalled in an interview.  “I didn’t worry about it that much.”

But the two-year-old feline’s condition worsened.  And one day, Cherry could not find him, despite a long search of all his favorite haunts in the yard of her Torrance home.  By this time Baby Kitty had stopped eating entirely, she said, and she was worried.  Her veterinarian, Dr. Alice Villalobos of Pawspice and Animal Oncology in Hermosa Beach,  suggested that she search places “where you know he couldn’t be – every crack and crevice.” And she found him in a stack of wood that he had crawled inside.

“He realized that he couldn’t eat and he had crawled in there and decided that he would die there,” she said. “He was turning into a skeleton and his food was not being processed by his body.”

She took Baby Kitty to Dr. Edward M. Leeds at Surgical Group for Animals in Torrance, referred by Dr. Villalobos, who had diagnosed the cat with a diaphragmatic hernia.  Cherry thinks that the condition may have been the consequence of a fall.  Many of his abdominal organs had crowded into his chest cavity, impinging on his lungs and heart and threatening his life.

The Surgical Group performed corrective surgery and guided Cherry to Angel Fund, which provided a grant of $500.  The hospital contributed $1,938.  “It wasn’t something I could take care of,“ Cherry said. “I had had some really hard times financially.”

She was told that the likelihood was that her cat would not survive. But she said, “everyone was pulling for Baby Kitty. There was no doubt in my mind that he would pull through.”  He did.  And now, she said, “he is a much sweeter cat.  He’s the most loving cat.  It really shows how thankful he was that he was saved.  He’s really touched a lot of hearts and that makes him all the more special.”

Baby Kitty’s recovery was not without its problems.  He and his brother Poofa are outdoor cats and they want to keep it that way, Cherry said.  He hated being in a cage where he needed to be confined for a month, she said.  “He just went crazy.  It meant I couldn’t work like a needed to.  He needed a lot of love and care. I had to hold him and calm him and keep him settled because he wanted out.  Even wearing a cone, he figured out how to get out of that cage. He was able to lift the edge of it and slide out – and it was a heavy cage.  He flattened his body like a rat.  He didn’t want to be in there.”

Today, life is back to normal for Cherry and her two cats.  “They’re pretty spoiled,” she said.  “They have lots of places to go, here and at the neighbors, I’m sure.  They share a big lot with possums, raccoons, rats and the occasional coyote.

She doesn’t see coyotes as a problem for Baby Kitty and Poofa, who previously lost a leg to surgery.  “I have amazing crows here who love the cats. After the surgery, a coyote came to eat cats on my property. Believe it or not, the crows went insane.

“All of them descended on this area and I came out [wondering] what is all this ruckus? And they were telling me that the coyote was there, glaring at Baby Kitty and Baby Kitty was glaring back. I shooed the coyote off.  It happened one other time. And I came out and sure enough there was a coyote here again.  So the crows take care of the kitties and the kitties catch rats for them.”

She said that her cats are the welcoming committee for her clients who visit the office she built outside her house.  And, she said, “Babby Kitty loves to make me laugh.  He’s a funny creature and he has personality.  He loves to play tag.  He wants you to pet him and if you try to step away, he’ll reach around – without claws – and whack you, like you’ve got to pet him some more.  It’s a game.”

Her experience with Angel Fund, Cherry said, “has helped me to share with all my clients the benefits that are out there – the people, the loving way that they went about it, their generosity.”

AHF Helps the Pets of the Homeless in Orange County

July 12th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation

Listen as the AHF Board of Trustees President, Dr. Mark Malo (owner of Garden Grove Dog and Cat Hospital).

It speaks about the fnancial grants we are providing to help the pets of the homeless in Orange County with mobile clinics once a month.  These clinics provide vaccines, flea and tick treatments, ear infection treatments, and other minor treatments.

Listen and learn a bit more about what your donations support!

 

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

 

 

Bat Found on Corner of S. Country Hills Road and S. Mohler Dr. in Anaheim Tests Positive for Rabies 

June 20th, 2018 by Animal Health Foundation
COURTESY–Orange County Animal Care and Orange County Health Care Agency
 
(Santa Ana, CA) – A bat found was found on the corner of S. Country Hills Road and S. Mohler Dr. in Anaheim, California on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 at approximately 7:15 p.m. and has since tested positive for rabies.
 
Anyone who may have had physical contact with this bat or saw someone else having contact with the bat is asked to call the OC Health Care Agency (HCA) Epidemiology team at (714) 834-8180 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. or (714) 834-7792 after hours to determine the risk for rabies.
 
The rabies virus is found in an animal’s saliva and is transmitted to people by a bite from a rabid animal. Although very rare, contamination of the eyes, mouth or an open wound by the saliva of a rabid animal can also transmit rabies. Most cases of human rabies in the United States in recent years have resulted from bat strains of rabies; bats have very small teeth, and their bites may go unnoticed.
 
Once a person begins showing signs and symptoms of rabies, the disease is nearly always fatal. For that reason, preventive treatment to stop the rabies virus from causing illness is given to anyone who may have been exposed to rabies. Medical assistance should be obtained promptly after an exposure so any wound can be cleaned and preventive treatment can be started. This treatment is safe and effective.
 
HCA and OC Animal Care recommend the following actions to minimize the risk of rabies:
 
Avoid all contact with wild animals.
Vaccinate all cats and dogs against rabies.
Do not sleep with open unscreened windows or doors.
If bats are seen inside the house or other structure, close off the area and contact animal control. Once the bat(s) have been removed, close off any areas allowing entrance into the house.
Do not leave pet food outside where it will attract wild animals.
Immediately wash all animal bites with soap and water, being sure to flush the wound well, then contact your doctor.
Report all animal bites to OC Animal Care.
Report stray animals to OC Animal Care.
 
Potential exposure to a bat or other wild animal should be reported to HCA Epidemiology at (714) 834-8180. 
To report a bat in your home, an animal bite, or a stray animal, contact OC Animal Care at (714) 935-6848. 
More information about rabies is available at the Centers for Disease Control website at www.cdc.gov/rabies