Animal Health Foundation Blog

Archive for the ‘Cats’ Category

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Thursday, March 15th, 2018

8 Things Every Dog Owner Should Know When Their Pet Crosses The Rainbow Bridge

Sunday, January 21st, 2018
For WWW.LITTLETHINGS.COM by REBECCA ENDICOTT
artwork by Laura Caseley for Little Things

Unfortunately, it’s the nature of pet ownership to lose your beloved fluff ball. The average human will live eight decades, but a dog’s lifespan is much shorter.

According to the American Kennel Club, dogs live for an average of 10 to 13 years, depending on the breed.

That means that every human who welcomes a sweet pup into the family will have to eventually face the tricky proposition of losing a furry best friend.

There are lots of beautiful ways to memorialize your dog after he crosses the rainbow bridge, but that isn’t necessarily comforting in the days immediately before and after a pooch passes on.

In fact, it can be really hard to prepare for that moment.

That’s why we put together a list of important things all pooch-owners should know for the day their beloved dog dies.

#1: The Grief Will Hit Hard

#1: The Grief Will Hit Hard

You might be surprised by how hard you are hit by grief.

It’s easy to think that you will be able to cope with the death of your pet, but people often discover that they are just as devastated by the loss of their dog as they would be by any death.

Even though humans know intellectually that they’ll have to say goodbye to their beloved dogs eventually, it doesn’t make it any easier to face the reality.

#2: You Might Feel Guilty

#2: You Might Feel Guilty

Guilt is a totally normal emotion to experience as you’re processing your loss and grief, but people are sometimes taken aback by how strongly they blame themselves.

People worry that perhaps there was something more they could have done early, they worry that they made the wrong decision, or that they missed a sign that their pup was in pain or unwell.

These worries are totally normal, but try not to let them take you over. At some point, you have to trust that you did everything you could for your sweet pup, and he loved you for it.

#3: Your Vet Will Be More Of A Comfort Than You Expect

#3: Your Vet Will Be More Of A Comfort Than You Expect

During your dog’s lifetime, the veterinarian is just the person who gives your pup shots and diagnoses infections.

After you pup dies, the veterinarian might become your best friend for a while.

That’s because vets see this kind of loss every day, and they often know exactly how to support and comfort a grieving pet parent.

Vets can also help you with details like figuring out how to lay your dog to rest; many vets offer cremation services and memorial boxes.

#4: Grief Can Spike Unexpectedly

#4: Grief Can Spike Unexpectedly

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

After you lose your dog, you’ll probably spend a few days mourning before slowly starting to feel better.

When that happens, it’s easy to think that the worst of your grief is behind you, though that often isn’t the case.

Sometimes, grief will reemerge as fresh and painful as the day your dog died. Know that the grieving process is long and complex, and let it take its natural course.

#5: You Might Have To Make The Choice

#5: You Might Have To Make The Choice

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

For many dog owners, the most difficult part of losing their pet actually comes before the pet passes on.

Many owners find themselves in the painful position of choosing to end the dog’s life, and having him put to sleep.

When you adopt a dog, you have to be prepared for the possibility of making this choice.

If your dog is elderly, in pain, and unable to comprehend what’s happening, it might be your responsibility to help him avoid unnecessary pain and suffering.

#6: It’s Worth Asking For Paw Prints

#6: It's Worth Asking For Paw Prints

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

After your dog passes away, your vet will usually offer to help with the remains, often by cremation.

Before that happens, you might want to ask the vet to take your dog’s paw prints for you.

Many vets are happy to help you through your goodbye by giving you one last memento of your beloved pup.

Even as you move on, having his paw prints is a lovely way to remember a loyal and beloved friend.

#7: If Possible, Be There

#7: If Possible, Be There

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

We don’t always have a choice in how our dogs pass on.

If it’s an accident or completely unexpected, you might not be with your dog at the end.

However, if you can choose to be with your dog, definitely do it, though it might be painful for you.

What’s important is that your dog will feel loved and unafraid with you by his side holding his paw.

#8: Remember, You Gave Your Pup The Best Life

#8: Remember, You Gave Your Pup The Best Life

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

Eventually, as the weeks and months pass, you’ll find yourself healing. You’ll never stop loving and missing your dog, but you’ll know that your pup is in a better place now.

Most important of all, you will know that, while he was here with you, you gave him the best life ever.

He loved you to pieces, and we bet he wouldn’t have traded one second of the life the two of you had together.

 

 

Dr. Jean Dodds – Feline Vaccination Protocol

Saturday, December 9th, 2017

2013-2016 FELINE VACCINATION PROTOCOL – W. JEAN DODDS, DVM

Approximately seven years ago, the American Association of Feline Practitioners(AAFP) sponsored and conducted a groundbreaking study on feline vaccines. The panel – which included Dr. Dodds’ colleague, Dr. Ron Schultz – divided the vaccines into core and non-core. Just this year, the AAFP published updated feline vaccination guidelines. Dr. Dodds agrees with the panel’s findings, with the exception of giving feline leukemia vaccine to kittens that will be kept strictly indoors. She also prefers a more minimal and delayed vaccination schedule to offset potential adverse vaccine reactions and feline vaccine injection site-associated sarcomas. Additionally, Dr. Dodds considers factors such as presence of maternal immunity, prevalence of viruses or other infectious agents in the region, number of reported occurrences of the viruses and other infectious agents, how these agents are spread, and the typical environmental conditions and exposure risk activities of companion animals.

2013-2016 Feline Vaccination Protocol
Note:
 The following vaccine protocol is offered for those cats where minimal vaccinations are advisable or desirable. The schedule is one Dr. Dodds recommends and should not interpreted to mean that other protocols recommended by a veterinarian would be less satisfactory. It’s a matter of professional judgment and choice.

8-9 Weeks Old:
Panleukopenia (feline parvovirus), Calicivirus, Rhinopneumonitits Virus (feline herpesvirus-1)
(FVRCP)

12-13 Weeks Old:
Same as above

24 Weeks or Older (if required by law):
Rabies (e.g. Merial Purevax™, recombinant)

1 Year:
FVRCP booster (optional = titer)

1+ Year:
Rabies, same as above but separated by 2-3 weeks from FVRCP

Perform vaccine antibody titers for panleukopenia virus every three years thereafter, or more often, if desired. Vaccinate for rabies virus according to the law, except where circumstances indicate that a written waiver needs to be obtained from the primary care veterinarian.  In that case, a rabies antibody titer can also be performed to accompany the waiver request. Visit Rabies Challenge Fund.

W. Jean Dodds, DVM
Hemopet / NutriScan
11561 Salinaz Avenue
Garden Grove, CA 92843

DARWIN’S PET FOOD RECALL

Saturday, December 9th, 2017

Darwin’s Natural Pet Products of Tukwila, Washington, has notified its customers that it is recalling 2 lots of its Natural Selections raw dog food products because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella bacteria.

To learn which products are affected, please visit the following link:Darwin’s Dog Food Recall of December 2017

Please be sure to share the news of this alert with other pet owners.

Mike Sagman, Editor
The Dog Food Advisor

P.S. Not already on our dog food recall notification list yet? Sign up to get critical dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. There’s no cost for this service.

Tips for How to Pick the Right Pet Insurance

Saturday, October 21st, 2017

From Top Dog Tips (www.topdogtips.com)

Since 2009, the number of pet health insurance companies in North America has exploded, and more pet owners today than ever before are in search of great companies and the best coverage plan. But what makes a coverage plan the “best” for you and your pet?

The goal of having pet health insurance is to save money on your vet bills. However, picking the best pet insurance plan can become complicated when you’re not sure what to look for, and the wrong option can cost you more in the end. With so many pet insurance choices available today, doing the research and comparing all available plans can save you hundreds of dollars every year. So here’s what you must know before you set out to pick the right type of plan and provider for your dogs and cats.

Pet Health Insurance Tips

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<p><strong>Please include attribution to TopDogTips.com with this graphic.</strong></p><p><a href=”https://topdogtips.com/pet-health-insurance-tips/”><img src=”https://topdogtips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Pet-Health-Insurance-Tips.jpg” alt=”19 Pet Health Insurance Tips” border=”0″ /></a></p>

Pet Health Insurance Facts and Tips
How to Pick the Right Provider and Coverage Plan?

Since the US pet health insurance industry got its first start back in 1982 (Nationwide was the first), it has been growing at staggering rates. North American Pet Health Insurance Association (NAPHIA) has been reporting consistent growth over the years. Here are some current numbers:

  • 1.8 million pets insured in the United States
  • 220,000 pets insured in Canada
  • 4.8 years is the average age of insured pets

Average annual premiums:

  • Accidents and illness plans – $496 per pet
  • Accidents only – $163 per pet
  • Average claim amount paid out – $264

Most popular types of coverage:

  • Accidents and illness insurance – 98%
  • Accidents only – 2%

The growth rate of the pet health insurance industry is nothing short of impressive, too. For example, the total premium volume combined at the end of 2016 was reported at $836.6 million (this is a +21.4% increase from the previous year). Here’s what the last few years looked like:

  • End of 2015 – $688.9 million (+17.1% increase from the year before)
  • End of 2014 – $588.4 million (+17.7% increase from the year before)
  • End of 2013 – $499.8 million

Currently, there are 12 major pet insurance providers in North America, and we’ll discuss those below. The reason for their existence is the expensive pet care that dog owners and cat owners have to deal with, which includes veterinary bills, surgeries, health supplies and preventative treatments. According to data collected by American Pet Products Association (APPA), pet owners spend staggering amounts every year.

Total estimated pet health sales in the U.S. for 2017:

  • Veterinary care – $16.62 billion
  • OTC Medicine – $14.93 billion

This can be broken down into several categories. On average, below is what an pet owner would spend.

Surgical expenses:

  • Dog – $474 per year
  • Cat – $245 per year

Routine health expenses:

  • Dog – $257 per year
  • Cat – $182 per year

Vitamins and supplements:

  • Dog – $58 per year
  • Cat – $46 per year

This is just a fraction of pet care expenses that majority of pet owners in the USA and Canada will encounter. All these numbers combined result in a hefty sum, which explains why pet health insurance is becoming more popular every year, as more pet owners try to provide the best possible care while saving a good chunk of money in the process.

19 Pet Health Insurance Tips to Help You Pick the Best Plan

With so many pet health insurance providers offering different coverage plans it’s becoming increasingly difficult to understand and pick the right one that fits the bill for you and your pet. Here are nineteen questions you should probably ask yourself and the provider before making the final decision.

1. Who’s the Best?

Compare all available pet insurance plans.

Do the research and begin comparing all pet insurance providers and their plans side-by-side to see their costs for premiums, co-pays, deductibles, reimbursements and other vital details.

2. How Old is the Provider?

It’s a clever idea to pick someone with more experience.

The longer pet insurance provider has been around, the more experience and budget they are likely to have, offering better terms. It’s also much easier to find feedback and reviews of an older provider.

3. Are They State Licensed?

Not every provider can legally sell insurance in all states.

When buying pet insurance online, make sure the company is allowed to sell it in your state. Also consider if your pet will be covered in case you move to a different state in the future.

4. Is There a Money Back Guarantee?

This is a wonderful way to test the provider with minimal risk.

Majority of pet insurance providers will offer a money back guarantee period, which is when you get all the paperwork and review it thoroughly. If you’re unhappy, take your money back and move on.

5. Are They Dependable?

Check insurance provider’s reviews and track record.

After comparing plans, go through their reviews online, ask for feedback on forums, and do some research on their track record so you know you can count on them to pay when the time comes.

6. Do They Offer Medical Review?

This is a list of coverage exclusions which can make or break the deal.

Make sure that your provider offers and does the medical review before your money back guarantee expires. That way if you’re unhappy with their exclusions, you can move onto the next one.

7. Can You Pick Your Own Vet?

Some providers may not allow you to pick your own vet.

In most cases, it’s best that you’re allowed to pick your own veterinarian. Company assigned veterinarian may not be close to your location or simply isn’t someone you trust enough.

8. Is Their Customer Support Good?

Great customer services is often worth the extra cost.

There’s nothing more frustrating than having your provider ignore calls or keep you on hold for hours. Before you pick one, call them, email them and check their website to see how they’re doing.

9. What Happens When You Go Out of State?

If you plan to travel with your pet out of state, this is important.

Check if your plan covers any veterinarian or specialist visits when you’re traveling out of state. Most insurance providers offer that, and some even provide coverage for vet visits in foreign countries.

10. Will There Be Restrictions?

Read their plan details in full to know what your pet is covered for.

Go through the provider’s insurance plan in full to know what may affect your pet’s coverage and what exactly is covered. Pay special attention to pre-existing conditions and what may increase premiums.

11. What’s Best for Your Case?

Only pick a type of coverage that will work specifically for your situation.

Read about their different coverage types and consider what’s worth it and what isn’t for your pet. Sometimes just routine wellness coverage is enough while other times you may want full coverage.

12. What Is Their Bilateral Conditions Policy?

Many providers have restrictions on the bilateral conditions policy.

Health conditions like hip dysplasia or cruciate injuries may not be covered fully with some plans. Make sure you understand what is the provider’s policy on these and other bilateral conditions.

13. How Are You Getting Paid?

Choose the type of reimbursement that fits the bill.

Insurance providers have several ways they calculate reimbursement. Consider if you’re more comfortable with a benefit schedule, percentage of invoice or the UCR structure.

14. How Long Before You Get Paid?

Find out how long you’ll have to wait before you’re reimbursed.

You’ll pay the vet bill out of your own pocket, so after you check the type of reimbursement, make sure you know how long it takes your chosen provider to pay you back. Read reviews to confirm this.

15. Is It Worth It?

Think about the price you pay for the value that you’re getting.

Pet insurance may not always be the best choice for you. If a provider is cheap but doesn’t offer a plan that doesn’t cover what your pet needs, there’s no point in using them. Move onto the next one.

16. How Healthy Is Your Pet?

Try to avoid enrolling your pet when he’s old or unhealthy.

Some providers will either offer only limited insurance, or charge an arm and a leg for older pets or those who already have health issues. In many cases, pet insurance is not worth it for older pets.

17. What About Premium Increases?

Pay attention when and by how much your premiums will increase.

All pet insurance providers will increase their premiums at some point. Make sure you know when and who they do this, and by how much you should expect your premiums to increase. It must be in writing.

18. Did You Negotiate?

It never hurts to ask for discounts or special plans.

After picking several best insurance providers, ask for any possible discounts. Some may offer a reduced price for households with multiple pets, while others will give you a discount simply because you asked.

19. Have You Considered Other Options?

Pet insurance is not always the best choice for every case.

If after all the research you still cannot find an ideal provider to fit your and your pet’s needs, consider skipping pet insurance and simply starting a “pet emergency fund.” Save up for that rainy day.

Comparing Popular Pet Insurance Providers

While the number of pet health insurance providers is growing, we still have only a handful of major providers that are well-known to pet owners in the US and Canada. Here are the twelve companies that have been offering the best pet health insurance plans for dogs and cats over the last decade.

ASPCA Pet Health Insurance

Website: https://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/

Plans available for dogs and cats that are 8 weeks or older, and there is no upper age limit.

Annual coverage limits range from $2,500 to $20,000 depending on plan. There are unlimited options available on certain plans. Choice of deductibles from $100 to $500 and reimbursement levels of 70%, 80% and 90% of the vet bill.

AKC Pet Insurance

Website: https://www.akcpetinsurance.com/

Plans available for dogs 8 weeks and older, and for cats 10 weeks and older; up to any age for accident coverage and before ninth birthday for illness coverage.

Annual coverage limits range from $3,000 to $16,000. There is a lifetime limit per injury or illness of $1,500 to $8,000. Deductibles from $100 to $1,000 and reimbursement up to 80% of eligible charges.

Embrace Pet Insurance

Website: https://www.embracepetinsurance.com/

Plans available for dogs and cats up to the age of 14 years old.

Annual coverage limits range from $5,000 to $15,000. Choice of deductibles from $200 to $1,000 and reimbursement levels of 65%, 80% or 90%.

Figo Pet Insurance

Website: https://figopetinsurance.com/

Plans available for dogs and cats aged 6 weeks and older with no upper age limits.

Annual coverage limits of $10,000, $14,000 and unlimited. Choice of deductibles of $50, $100, $200 and $500 and reimbursement levels of 70%, 80%, 90% and 100%.

Healthy Paws Pet Insurance

Website: https://www.healthypawspetinsurance.com/

Plans available for dogs and cats of 8 weeks and up to the age of 14 years old.

There is no annual or per incident caps on coverage and unlimited lifetime benefits. Choice of deductibles range from $100 to $500 and reimbursement levels of 70%, 80% and 90%.

Trupanion Pet Insurance

Website: http://trupanion.com/

Plans available for dogs and cats of 8 weeks and up to the age of 14 years old.

There is only one plan with no payout limits. Deductibles range between $0 and $1,000.

Nationwide Pet Insurance

Website: https://www.petinsurance.com/

Plans available for dogs and cats up to age of 10 years old.

Annual deductible choices are $100 or $250.

24PetWatch Pet Insurance

Website: https://www.24petwatch.com/us/pet_insurance/

Plans available for dogs of 10 weeks and up to 10 years old, and for cats of 8 weeks and up to 12 years old.

Annual coverage limits range from $3,000 to $20,000 with $100 deductible and 80% reimbursement.

In Summary

Having all the needed information and comparing both the company and their plans can help make the right decision that will not only provide all the necessary pet health insurance coverage for your dog or cat, but also save you plenty of money at the end of the year (instead of doing the opposite).

Who’s your provider, which plan have you chosen and why did you make that decision?

How To Treat Tick Bites from The Whole Dog Journal

Monday, September 25th, 2017

A dog in the wrong place at the wrong time can be bit by dozens or even hundreds of ticks. Deer ticks go through three stages of life (larva, nymph, and adult), and feed only once in each of these stages; a blood meal ends each stage.

Larval ticks dine on mice and other small rodents, but nymphs and adults are a threat to dogs.

Because they are small and their bites don’t itch, ticks are easily overlooked, especially adult deer ticks and the nymphs of any species. Ticks prefer warm, moist conditions, so double-check under collars and around ears. If you aren’t sure what a lump or bump is, inspect it with a magnifying glass. Warts, similar skin growths, and nipples can feel like feeding ticks.

Be careful when removing a tick to grasp it with tweezers firmly at the head, as close to the dog’s skin as possible, and slowly pull straight back. Never twist, press, burn, or apply irritating substances like kerosene to an attached tick because doing so can cause the parasite to expel the contents of its digestive tract, creating an unwanted hypodermic effect.

Three-percent hydrogen peroxide, the common disinfectant, is recommended for tick bites because the oxygen it contains destroys the Lyme disease bacteria. Hydrogen peroxide can be liberally poured over bites on light-haired dogs (keep away from eyes and apply directly to the skin) but because it’s a bleach, this method is not recommended for black or dark-haired dogs.

Using an eyedropper to apply hydrogen peroxide directly to the bite helps prevent unwanted bleaching.

For more advice on ways to avoid and deal with ticks, purchase and download the ebook Ticks and Canine Lyme Disease from Whole Dog Journal.

Build a Pet First Aid Kit

Monday, September 25th, 2017

From “www.doggieandme.com”

Go To:  http://www.doggieandme.com/build-a-pet-first-aid-kit.html

Or Preview Below

 

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You can only work with what you have!

While you may purchase a pet first aid kit and then add to them. We suggest building a kit of your own. Print the list and then add one item to it every time you go to the store! In no time at all you will have and be familiar with each item in your kit.

   Remember to take a Pet First Aid and CPR Class
as the items in your kit are only as good as your knowledge to use them!

Below is a list of items we suggest for a basic kit.

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A Basic Pet First Aid kit should contain;
Latex-Free Gloves
Cotton Swabs (*Q-Tips)
Small and Large plastic Syringe (*No needles)
BPS Free Water Bottle (filled)
Blunt Nose Scissors
Ticked-Off Tick Remover
CPR Shield
Tweezers
Digital Thermometer
White Adhesive Roll Tape
Non-Stick Pads for Burns (6)
Gauze Squares (10)
Gauze Rolls (4)
Flex-Wrap Self-Adhering Elastic Bandage
Triangular Bandage for slings/splints or bandannas
Emergency Blanket
Portable Food and Water Bowl
Emergency Meal and Water
Doggie Walk Bags
Pets Toy
Emergency ID Tag
Pet First Aid Book
Emergency contact names and numbers
Some ER Cash
One-Size-Fits-All Temporary Muzzle
Extra Leashes and or “D” Leash
Cold Packs 

Antiseptic Towelettes
3% Hydrogen Peroxide (4 fl oz)
Saline Solution Eye Wash (4 fl oz)
Iodine Swab Sticks / Antiseptic
Triple Antibiotic Ointment (*Neosporian)
1% Hydrocortisone Cream / Anti-inflammatory
Tri-Buffered Aspirin Tablets (as prescribed by vet)
Diphen Tablets/Antihistamine (*Benadryl)
Diotame Tablets/Antacid (*Tums)
Simethicone (*Gas-X)
Antibacterial Soap (*Dial barsoap)
Chlorexidine Cleanser (*Hibiclens)
Water Based Protectant (*K-Y Jelly)
Styptic Powder


Special items in my own kit include; 
Pedialyte
Witch Hazel or Vinegar
Gold Bond Powder
(*Vetericyn)
Aloe Vera
Activated Charcoal
Liquid Bandage

Additional Items in my home;
Ginger Snap Cookies
Plain Yogurt (for Probiotics)
Epson Salts
Pure Pumpkin
Mineral Oil
Homeopaths

Remember to take a Pet First Aid and CPR Class
as the items in your kit are only as good as your knowledge to use them!
Confidence comes from knowing you are using the right product and techniques.

Go To www.doggieandme.com and sign up for first aid classes!

Sweetheart Fights Cancer With Angel Fund’s Help

Monday, July 24th, 2017

In September, 2015, Elaine Leonard’s 14-year-old cat, Sweetheart, was not feeling well.  She was coughing and lethargic and Elaine decided she should take her to see her veterinarian.

She lives in Orange and OC Veterinary Medical Center, owned by Dr. Jeffery Horn, was not far from her home.  Doctors there ran tests and examined Sweetheart, a Maine Coon breed.  They found respiratory problems and a large mass in her chest. They suspected cancer and lymphoma.  She also had some other physical issues.

Dr. Cooper (a veterinarian who no longer works at the hospital) told Elaine that “this is serious.  Sweetheart has a very large mass and you’d better think about things and what you want to do.”  She added that the animal might need surgery.

“I told them that I was not going to let my 14-year-old cat have surgery,” Elaine said.  She was concerned because of Sweetheart’s age and because of the expense – she did not believe she could afford an operation.

Dr. Horn prescribed antibiotics and pain medication and referred Elaine to Veterinary Cancer Group in Tustin, which has several oncology specialists on staff.  Sweetheart was examined there in November by Dr. David Bommarito, who is board certified in both oncology and radiation oncology.

Dr. Bommarito told Elaine that her cat might be treatable with chemotherapy.  But she chose to provide palliative care.  “My option for choosing palliative care was that   I couldn’t afford the expense of chemo treatment and didn’t want her to suffer any possible side effects,” Elaine said.

A retiree on a fixed income, she applied to Angel Fund for help with her bill.  Her request was granted.  Veterinary Cancer Group also contributed.  Elaine said that “of course” she appreciated the help and said that she also appreciated what Angel Fund has done to help many other pet owners.

She took Sweetheart home – although she had regular appointments with Dr. Horn.  The cat did pretty well for a few months.  “She was walking around and eating and drinking until shortly before she died” on March 25, 2016, Elaine said.  “On that last visit to Dr. Horn, he said to bring her in when you’re ready” for euthanasia.

But, she said, Sweetheart seemed to be doing OK. “I had her on morphine and I just wanted to keep her comfortable. She was eating and drinking and responding.  A week before she passed – she was a big cat and she’d never done this before – she pawed her was up on my bed and she got very close to me and she lay down next to my body.  She never had cuddled with me before.”

Within a few days Sweetheart was gone.

Angel Fund Helps Mango Overcome Chronic Disease

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

 

Some five years ago, Linda Lockwood found a stray cat outside her home in Vancouver, British Columbia.  “She was nobody’s cat.  I contacted shelters and looked around the neighborhood.  Nobody claimed her.  The shelter asked if I could keep her.  I had another cat but I thought I could take care of two.  So I said, OK, fine.”

Linda named her new charge Mango. She soon discovered that the new family member had some chronic health problems, particularly constipation.  “She had to get enemas once or twice a month,” she said.

Linda came to Southern California to go to school in June, 2014, with Mango in tow on the airplane.  (Her other cat had died.)  She enrolled at Pierce College in Winnetka, intending to become a veterinary technician because of her love of animals. But she ran into some trouble with a chemistry course and decided to change her major to computer science.  She did well – all A’s and one B –but decided to enroll at California Institute of the Arts to pursue her first love, music.  She will complete course work this spring on a master of fine arts degree.  Earlier, she had earned a bachelor’s degree of music in jazz studies from Vancouver Island University in British Columbia.

In November of 2015, Mango’s chronic constipation became a very real problem.  “She would poop everywhere – on my bed, on the floor,” Linda said.  “Sometimes, she’d try to poop and she couldn’t, so she’d cry. She was losing weight. She was extremely bloated because her colon was impacted.”  Linda had little money to spend but she took Mango to Happy Pets Veterinary Center in Valencia.

“They took x-rays and they told me how severe the problem was.  I just didn’t know what I was going to do,” Linda said. “Eventually, Dr. [Jane] Kelly told me, Mango was going to require surgery to remove almost the entire colon. She said she would have to refer me to a surgery specialist and that could cost more than $5,000 – and I just didn’t have that kind of money. But Dr. Kelly said that Mango’s life is at risk.  If you are unable to afford it, she’ll have to be put down.”

Dr. Kelly put Mango on intravenous fluids, multiple enemas, laxatives and pain medication for three days to stabilize her condition and suggested that Linda apply to Angel Fund for help. She did and received a grant of $275, a sum matched by Happy Pets.

But Mango still needed surgery.  “I found myself looking on the ground for coins, when I walked on campus,” Linda said.  “It only cost $1.20 to get rice and beans at my school, so that’s what I was eating.” Dr. Kelly suggested going to a low-cost clinic.

Linda talked to several clinics before selecting one. She raised money on a website, the largest contribution coming from a friend in Canada.  Mango got her surgery but the stitches holding the incision together quickly came out. “It was a gruesome thing. Her intestines came out,” Linda said.  “Everybody thought she was going to die.  I took her back and they sewed her up again – and the stitches came out again.”

This time, Linda found another veterinarian (on Christmas Eve), who repaired the damage and ordered Mango confined to a cage for a month as she healed. “After that month she was cage free and was as good as new,” Linda said.  “Today, she’s doing very well.  I give her everything that I can.”

And, she added, “I can’t believe I went through all of that.  I had to get extensions on all my essays and I had to leave classes early to pick Mango up.”

Linda believes that Angel Fund played a major role in saving her cat’s life. “Without them, I don’t know if Mango would have been in condition for what came next. The time she was in the hospital [at Happy Pets] bought some time for me to make plans for what to do.  I’m very grateful for what Angel Fund did for Mango.”

She also praised Dr. Kelly: “She is very compassionate and very caring.  I know she did it for Mango.”

And, she said, “It’s amazing how people, even if they don’t know you, they love animals.  I’m very grateful for what everyone has done for Mango.”

 

6 Natural Remedies for Your Dog’s Itchy Skin

Thursday, April 27th, 2017
Skin allergies are a common problem among dogs and owners and veterinarians alike are constantly fighting to make dogs more comfortable. Dogs, like people, can be allergic to just about anything, from their food to the environment. While there are many different medications to help deal with allergy symptoms, many of us prefer to go a more natural route first to make sure we’ve tried all of the safest options. Always consult with your veterinarian before giving your dog any treatments or supplements, but if you’re looking to try some natural allergy remedies, consider these.

#1 – Proper Bathing & Grooming

This might not seem like a “natural” remedy, but if your dog suffers from environmental allergies, frequent bathing and grooming is going to offer much needed comfort. Using soothing ingredients such as oatmeal in the shampoos will help your dog’s skin feel softer and will relieve the itching they feel. Depending on the severity of your dog’s allergies, bathing once a week will greatly improve your dog’s condition. Brushing and combing will also help remove dead skin and coat, promoting new growth and removing allergens on top of the skin and fur.

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IMAGE SOURCE: MAUREEN_SILL VIA FLICKR

#2 – Feed a Wholesome Diet

Your dog’s diet might be completely overlooked if your dog only suffers environmental allergens. But the more natural your dog’s diet, the better their bodies are able to fight off and heal from allergies and external stressors. If your dog is allergic to certain ingredients, you’ll want to avoid those ingredients and replace them with something else. Grain-free diets are highly recommended for dogs with any type of allergy (or no allergy at all!) but if this isn’t possible, consider feeding organic, whole grains. The better your dog’s nutrition, the better their overall health and their ability to fight off allergens.

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Image source: Oleg. via Flickr

#3 – Try Apple Cider Vinegar

Organic, raw, unfiltered apple cider offers many benefits to dogs suffering from allergies. If your dog has hot spots or itchy skin, you can apply a 50/50 solution of apple cider vinegar and water to your dog. Put the solution in a spray bottle for easy use. This same spray will help repel fleas and ticks – a common allergen for many dogs. You can also use it to clean out your dog’s ears. The acidity of the mixture makes for an environment that yeast can’t live in – and yeast infections are typically caused by allergies. Make sure that the acidity isn’t too strong for your dog – some prefer a different mixture than the 50/50 suggested.

#4 – Manage Heat & Moisture

Your dog’s environment plays a large role in the health of their skin. Be sure to keep your home appropriately cooled and use a humidifier in dry conditions. When grooming, avoid using a high heat blow dryer, which might be faster but wreaks havoc on your dog’s sensitive skin.

Make sure your dog always has access to fresh, filtered water. Dogs on a dry kibble diet are in need of more moisture in their diets than dogs that eat a home-cooked, raw, or wet food diet.

#5 – Consider Applying Calendula

Calendula is a member of the sunflower family and offers several benefits to dogs with allergies. Either made into a tea or gel, applying calendula to your dog’s skin will help relieve inflammation from allergies. It also has natural anti-fungal and anti-yeast properties. It also helps improve your dog’s immune system when taken internally, so consider this as an allergy treatment as well.

#6 – Add Omega-3 Fatty Acids Supplementation

Omega-3 fatty acids are extremely beneficial to dogs with allergies. These oils help improve your dog’s skin and coat by keeping the natural oils present in healthy amounts. Omega-3s also work as anti-inflammatories and greatly reduce the intensity of allergens. There are many Omega-3 fatty acids on the market, and you’ll want to look for something that works quickly to support a soft, silky coat, minimize normal shedding, and maintain the skin’s normal moisture content, such as Project Paws™ Omega-3 Select soft chews.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional.