Archive for January, 2018

Cushings Disease – Dr. Jean Dodds

Monday, January 22nd, 2018

Check out this information on Cushings Disease from Hemopet

 

Please download: https://gallery.mailchimp.com/65fe703d8ce705ddce0e30120/files/0415f5f8-d92b-46d7-9f0c-9ee4459f0af1/HHC_Talks_18_Cushing_s.pdf

8 Things Every Dog Owner Should Know When Their Pet Crosses The Rainbow Bridge

Sunday, January 21st, 2018
For WWW.LITTLETHINGS.COM by REBECCA ENDICOTT
artwork by Laura Caseley for Little Things

Unfortunately, it’s the nature of pet ownership to lose your beloved fluff ball. The average human will live eight decades, but a dog’s lifespan is much shorter.

According to the American Kennel Club, dogs live for an average of 10 to 13 years, depending on the breed.

That means that every human who welcomes a sweet pup into the family will have to eventually face the tricky proposition of losing a furry best friend.

There are lots of beautiful ways to memorialize your dog after he crosses the rainbow bridge, but that isn’t necessarily comforting in the days immediately before and after a pooch passes on.

In fact, it can be really hard to prepare for that moment.

That’s why we put together a list of important things all pooch-owners should know for the day their beloved dog dies.

#1: The Grief Will Hit Hard

#1: The Grief Will Hit Hard

You might be surprised by how hard you are hit by grief.

It’s easy to think that you will be able to cope with the death of your pet, but people often discover that they are just as devastated by the loss of their dog as they would be by any death.

Even though humans know intellectually that they’ll have to say goodbye to their beloved dogs eventually, it doesn’t make it any easier to face the reality.

#2: You Might Feel Guilty

#2: You Might Feel Guilty

Guilt is a totally normal emotion to experience as you’re processing your loss and grief, but people are sometimes taken aback by how strongly they blame themselves.

People worry that perhaps there was something more they could have done early, they worry that they made the wrong decision, or that they missed a sign that their pup was in pain or unwell.

These worries are totally normal, but try not to let them take you over. At some point, you have to trust that you did everything you could for your sweet pup, and he loved you for it.

#3: Your Vet Will Be More Of A Comfort Than You Expect

#3: Your Vet Will Be More Of A Comfort Than You Expect

During your dog’s lifetime, the veterinarian is just the person who gives your pup shots and diagnoses infections.

After you pup dies, the veterinarian might become your best friend for a while.

That’s because vets see this kind of loss every day, and they often know exactly how to support and comfort a grieving pet parent.

Vets can also help you with details like figuring out how to lay your dog to rest; many vets offer cremation services and memorial boxes.

#4: Grief Can Spike Unexpectedly

#4: Grief Can Spike Unexpectedly

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

After you lose your dog, you’ll probably spend a few days mourning before slowly starting to feel better.

When that happens, it’s easy to think that the worst of your grief is behind you, though that often isn’t the case.

Sometimes, grief will reemerge as fresh and painful as the day your dog died. Know that the grieving process is long and complex, and let it take its natural course.

#5: You Might Have To Make The Choice

#5: You Might Have To Make The Choice

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

For many dog owners, the most difficult part of losing their pet actually comes before the pet passes on.

Many owners find themselves in the painful position of choosing to end the dog’s life, and having him put to sleep.

When you adopt a dog, you have to be prepared for the possibility of making this choice.

If your dog is elderly, in pain, and unable to comprehend what’s happening, it might be your responsibility to help him avoid unnecessary pain and suffering.

#6: It’s Worth Asking For Paw Prints

#6: It's Worth Asking For Paw Prints

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

After your dog passes away, your vet will usually offer to help with the remains, often by cremation.

Before that happens, you might want to ask the vet to take your dog’s paw prints for you.

Many vets are happy to help you through your goodbye by giving you one last memento of your beloved pup.

Even as you move on, having his paw prints is a lovely way to remember a loyal and beloved friend.

#7: If Possible, Be There

#7: If Possible, Be There

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

We don’t always have a choice in how our dogs pass on.

If it’s an accident or completely unexpected, you might not be with your dog at the end.

However, if you can choose to be with your dog, definitely do it, though it might be painful for you.

What’s important is that your dog will feel loved and unafraid with you by his side holding his paw.

#8: Remember, You Gave Your Pup The Best Life

#8: Remember, You Gave Your Pup The Best Life

Laura Caseley for LittleThings

Eventually, as the weeks and months pass, you’ll find yourself healing. You’ll never stop loving and missing your dog, but you’ll know that your pup is in a better place now.

Most important of all, you will know that, while he was here with you, you gave him the best life ever.

He loved you to pieces, and we bet he wouldn’t have traded one second of the life the two of you had together.

 

 

Canine Body Language Danger Signs

Wednesday, January 17th, 2018
Web Only Article May 19, 2017

By Pat Miller, CBCC-KA, CPDT-KA

The number of times a person has been bitten gives a big clue as to his capacity to read, understand, and respond properly to canine communications. Someone who has been bitten numerous times either doesn’t pay attention to what dogs say, or doesn’t respond appropriately.

Dogs almost always give clear signals – though the signs may be subtle – before they bite. A “bite without warning” is truly a rare occurrence. Most of the time the human just wasn’t listening, or didn’t have any education about what the dog was expressing. I have worked with dogs professionally for more than 40 years and, knock wood, experienced only a handful of bites, none of them serious.

I remember with crystal clarity an incident from when I was a humane officer for the Marin (California) Humane Society, responding to a complaint of a Rhodesian Ridgeback who was at large – and reportedly aggressive toward people. I pulled up in my animal control truck, got out, and started up the sidewalk toward the house. Suddenly I saw a brown blur out of the corner of my eye, and realized the Ridgeback was charging at me from behind the house. I froze in place.

She ran straight up to me and muzzle-punched me (hit me with her closed mouth). Although I had not received any in-depth training in understanding dog body language, I realized that this was a strong warning, and if I moved abruptly she would likely bite me. She stepped back a couple of feet, and I slowly backed up to my truck. Once there I was able to retrieve a control pole, gently noose her, load her into my truck and, unscathed, walk back to the house to talk to her owner. Phew!

The ability to read and react appropriately to dog body language can keep you safe with your own dog as well as others you may encounter. Here are four photos that present different levels of danger based on the dogs’ aggressive expressions.

dog hard stare

This mother dog is giving the photographer a direct stare – and her eyes look somewhat “hard.” Her stiff, forward-leaning posture and ears, and slightly pushed-forward lips, are warning you to stay back. She’s not aroused, just guarding her puppies. It would be wise to heed her warning.

dog aggressive posture

The next dog is also pushing her lips forward, in a slightly more threatening display. Her posture, tail, and ears are quite stiff, and her hair is standing up a little. She’s laser-focused on another dog, and not in a particularly friendly way. This dog hasn’t aggressed yet, but she’s starting to get aroused. We’d give her a wide berth.

dog aggression

Here are two dog body language lessons in one photo. The adult dog is making a fearsome face, drawing his lips back in an impressive snarl, and holding his ears and tail up and stiff. But notice that he’s not leaning at all forward, and his eyes are not super hard (though it’s difficult to see from this angle). He’s giving the puppy a stern warning to “Don’t come near me!” and the puppy reads this loud and clear. She’s responded with a classic puppy grovel: she’s lowered her body posture and leaned backward, and she’s holding her ears back and wagging her tail. She won’t look directly at the adult, but looks away with soft, squinty eyes. Note that she’s trying to appease the adult dog – she’s acknowledging his warning – but she isn’t terrified or afraid for her life.

untrained aggressive dog

This dog is dangerously conflicted. His lips are pushed forward hard, but his ears are pinned back; his eye contact is hard and direct but his tail is low. His posture looks like he’s leaning forward and back; he’s frightened and willing to come after you. This dog was being held following his (and another dog’s) attack on an elderly woman who was in her own yard. The dogs were untrained, unsocialized, and inadequately contained; both paid the ultimate price for their owner’s negligence and irresponsibility.

Just Food for Dogs First Recall Ever

Monday, January 15th, 2018

Recall notice provided by Just Food for Dogs…

Dear Friends, Customers, Veterinarians, Partners and Staff,

Honesty. Transparency. Pet advocacy. These are three of the Core Values that make JustFoodForDogs who and what we are. Most days, living up to these standards is pretty easy. We use only the best ingredients; we open our kitchens to the public; we treat every dog as if he were one of our own; and we regard every pet parent as family.

Today is more challenging than that. Today, sadly, I announce the only recall in the history of our company. And, in keeping with our core values, we will be providing the maximum (as opposed to the minimum) amount of information and guidance on this matter.

As of yesterday afternoon, we have confirmed that one batch of our Turducken special (made in our West Hollywood kitchen and code dated WH 11/18/18) tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes. We found it because one of our diligent customers reported that the food had made her dogs sick for a day with diarrhea and vomiting. (The dogs affected have made a full recovery after switching their food to one of our daily diets; they did not receive veterinary care). To be clear, this was the only case of illness reported, and severe illness in dogs by Listeria is rare. When we get reports from customers or veterinarians about potential food-caused illness in pets, we always take them seriously and follow up with the appropriate action, including lab testing. In almost eight years, we have never, not once, had a sample come back positive for pathogens. This one was different and we wanted to immediately let all of our Turducken customers know about it. It should also be noted that this form of Listeria can be harmful to humans if consumed.

If you are in possession of Turducken from West Hollywood with the above date, please email or call us at support@justfoodfordogs.com or 1-866-726-9509 and we will provide an immediate refund. While we have no reason to be concerned that other batches of Turducken were affected, we completely understand if you have this product and would like to return or exchange it for any reason.

Today we are notifying all Turducken customers who may have been affected and we are simultaneously conducting a series of additional tests to better understand the situation – the results of which we will share with all of our customers in less than 72 hrs from now.

As I sit here writing this memo with our executive team, it dawns on me that every recipient of this letter and all of us in this room have one very important commonality – we love our dogs and would always do what is best for them. Please know that, starting with my own Albert and Evelyne, we all continue to feed JustFoodForDogs with confidence. If you have any questions or concerns that have not been answered here please do not hesitate to email us at support@justfoodfordogs.com or 1-866-726-9509. If you prefer, you can reach me on my personal cell phone at (949) 378-2927. Or, if you would like to talk to our Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Oscar Chavez, BVetMed, MRCVS , he can be reached on his personal cell at (714) 206-8751. Alternatively, if you would like to speak with our CEO, Carey Tischler, he can be reached on his personal cell at (847) 942-2692.

We sincerely apologize for any concern or burden this may have caused you. Despite this unfortunate incident, we want to assure you that everyone at JustFoodForDogs is, as always, 100% committed to helping pets Iive longer, healthier lives.

Shawn Buckley
Founder, JustFoodForDogs

And follow up message from Just Food for Dogs…

This week has been more challenging. A few days ago, a diligent customer reported that our Turducken special made her dogs sick with vomiting and diarrhea. The dogs made a full recovery after a day, once switching their food to one of our daily diets; they did not receive veterinary care. Less than 72 hours ago, after the returned food confirmed positive for Listeria monocytogenes, we informed our Turducken customers about the only recall in the history of our company. Since then we have worked tirelessly to conduct extensive testing and a thorough investigation to establish the root cause of this issue. We promised an update.

This is that update.

It is genuinely heartbreaking to report that we have just received preliminary test results that suggest our human grade green bean supply was sent to us contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Healthy dogs may experience no signs but some, including elderly or weakened dogs, may experience vomiting and/or diarrhea. Severe disease from Listeria in dogs is rare. Listeria monocytogenes is more concerning in humans, if consumed. The health of your dogs is always our primary concern. For this reason, and based on the preliminary results, we are proactively and voluntarily taking the following actions:

• Expanding the Turducken recall to all batch dates
• Recalling our only two other recipes that contain green beans: Beef & Russet Potato and
Fish & Sweet Potato
• Notifying the FDA as this likely affects a broader human food supply of green beans

If you have fed these recipes and your dog is not currently experiencing any problems, do not worry. If you have any of the food listed above, please dispose of it and do not feed it to your dog. We will provide an immediate and unconditional credit to your account for all purchases made of these recipes between November 1st, 2017 and January 14th, 2018, upon request.

To make it easiest on you and to avoid waiting on hold, simply email us at support@justfoodfordogs.com with the first and last name on your account. We will process your credit and reply with the confirmed amount within 72 hours.

We know that many dogs rely on and love these recipes. Therefore, we are immediately preparing Beef & Russet Potato and Fish & Sweet Potato recipes without green beans. We expect to have these available by Wednesday at all locations. Our veterinarians ensure us that this is an appropriate temporary solution. In the meantime, we have plenty of recipes available that are made without green beans, including:

Balanced Remedy 
Shepherd’s Pie
Chicken & White Rice 
Turkey & Whole Wheat Macaroni
Joint & Skin Support 
Venison & Squash
Lamb & Brown Rice 
All Veterinary Support Recipes

These recipes are not covered by the recall and may continue to be fed to your dogs.

I am deeply sorry for this outcome. I spoke to one of our wonderful customers on Friday and she told me something that stuck with me – “we don’t expect JustFoodForDogs to be perfect Shawn, just perfectly honest.” Good or bad, you have our word that we will always be entirely transparent with our customers.

We founded JustFoodForDogs to increase the length and quality of life for as many pets as possible. While this issue may not be our fault, the safety and efficacy of every meal is our responsibility. As we work with our restaurant supplier, we will be implementing greater controls to prevent this from happening in the future. If you would like to speak to any member of our executive team, please feel free to reach us directly on our emails or personal cell phones (listed below).

• Amy Dampier, Vice President Retail Sales, amyd@justfoodfordogs.com
or cell 619-540-3484
• Ben Stickney, Vice President Operations, bens@justfoodfordogs.com
or cell 757-635-7660
• Dr. Oscar Chavez, BVetMed, MRCVS, Chief Medical Officer,
drchavez@justfoodfordogs.com or cell 714-206-8751
• Carey Tischler, Chief Executive Officer, careyt@justfoodfordogs.com
or cell 847-942-2692

Or you can reach me at shawnb@justfoodfordogs.com or cell 949-378-2927.

Shawn Buckley
Founder, JustFoodForDogs